Dispensational Thinkers, God Shows No Partiality

Dispensational theology makes Israel and the church into two distinct peoples of God. This is one of the stark differences between Dispensational theology and Reformed/Covenant theology. As Heidelberg 54 explains, Reformed thinkers believe that “the Son of God, out of the whole human race, from the beginning of the world to its end, gathers, defends, and preserves for Himself . . . a Church chosen to everlasting life.” The church began in the Garden of Eden, not at Pentecost. This...

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Louis Berkhof on Christ’s Intercession in Heaven for His Church & How Lutherans Differ from the Reformed

“Moreover, He is ever making intercession for those that are His, pleading for their acceptance on the basis of His completed sacrifice, and for their safe-keeping in the world, and making their prayers and services acceptable to God. The Lutherans stress the fact that the intercession of Christ is vocalis et realis, while the Reformed emphasize the fact that it consists primarily in the presence of Christ in man’s nature with the Father, and that the prayers are to be considered as the...

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Charles Hodge & Zacharias Ursinus on Christ’s Session at God’s Right Hand

“The subject of this exaltation was the Theanthropos; not the Logos specially or distinctively; not the human nature exclusively; but the theanthropic person. When a man is exalted it is not the soul in distinction from the body; nor the body in distinction from the soul, but the whole person.” [1] “Christ was, indeed, always glorious, but was not always exalted in the office of mediator, which is to say, in his kingdom and priesthood. The consummation of his glory, which...

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The Joy of Being Reformed (3): God Is Revealing Himself to You Every Day

About 22 years ago, I took a trip to France. While there, I visited the famed Louvre Museum in Paris, the home of Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa. I stood before this small but renowned painting housed in bulletproof glass gazing at its mystery, intrigue, innovation, and beauty. It’s not my favorite painting, but it’s remarkable, nonetheless. It’s remarkable because da Vinci was remarkable. Though we haven’t met him, we do know something about da Vinci by seeing his artwork. The Mona...

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The Joy of Being Reformed (2): How Knowing the One True God Fills Your Heart with Happiness & Thankfulness

This past Sunday evening we had two families over. They stayed for hours late into the evening. It was wonderful. Our connection began years ago at Grove City College before any of us were married. We don’t get to see them often, so when we’re together it’s memorable and sweet. Sunday night was just that. My heart was filled with happiness and thankfulness as I enjoyed our friends. Even our children—all twelve of them—who don’t know each other well, really connected and had a...

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The Joy of Being Reformed (1): The Belgic Confession of Faith

Are you Reformed? Am I? How would we go about answering that question? And if you were looking for a church home, and you visited a church that claimed to be Reformed, what might you expect them to teach and practice? Before we could say, “I’m Reformed” or “I’m not Reformed” or “I go to a Reformed church,” we’d need to know what it means to be historically Reformed. We’d need an honest and historically accurate definition of Reformed, right? And this isn’t very easy to...

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Encouragement for Older Saints to Finish Well

“Indeed, Christ drank all the poison of death in order that we might not taste the wrath of God in our death . . . . This should encourage us to be obedient to God in our deaths, since Christ yielded His will to that of the Father for us, and drank and removed the wrath of God for us like a bitter potion.” [1] “Thus our physical death is neither a payment for our sins nor an entrance into eternal death but a putting an end to our sinning and an entrance into eternal life.” [2] [1]...

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Colossians, Children Are the Church, & Infant Baptism

One problem I have with credobaptism is that it doesn’t consider covenant children part of Christ’s church. Credobaptism assumes covenant children, particularly infants, do not possess the seed of faith and are not united to Christ, therefore, they are considered outside the church and part of the kingdom of Satan. Since the children cannot verbalize faith in Christ, credobaptism assumes they are outside of Christ. Is that an assumption Christian parents and churches should make considering...

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Zacharias Ursinus about Lukewarm Christians Who Confess Christ but Show Little Interest in Repentance and Holiness

“He, therefore, who boasts of having applied to himself by faith the death of Christ, and yet has no desire to live a holy and godly life, that he may so honor the Savior, lies, and gives conclusive evidence that the truth is not in him; for all those who are justified are willing and ready to do those things which are pleasing to God. The desire to obey God can never be separated from an application of the death of Christ, nor can the benefit of regeneration be experienced without that...

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Who’s in Charge in Your Marriage?

New boy in the neighborhood Lives downstairs and it’s understood. He’s there just to take good care of me, Like he’s one of the family. Do you know these lyrics? If you grew up in the 80s, you might recognize them. Here’s the chorus: Charles in Charge of our days and our nights Charles in Charge of our wrongs and our rights And I sing, I want, I want Charles in Charge of me. Charles in Charge debuted on CBS in 1984. I was four years old. The star...

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