For Dispensationalists, Romanists, & Evangelicals to Consider

The rending of the veil proclaimed the termination and passing away of the ceremonial law. It was a sign that the old dispensation of sacrifices and ordinances was no longer needed. Its work was done. Its occupation was gone, from the moment that Christ died. There was no more need of an earthly high priest, and a mercy seat, and a sprinkling of blood, and an offering up of incense, and a day of atonement. The true High Priest had at length appeared. The true Lamb of God had been...

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A Marriage Made in Heidelberg (6): Your Spouse Is So Much Better than a Bed of Flames

Many marriage books are a waste of time, but I know one that certainly isn’t. Probably my favorite marriage book—and I use it in pre-marital counseling—is Friends and Lovers by Joel Beeke. It’s excellent, and it’s short. There are many helpful things in Beeke’s little book that if taken seriously and implemented, will make a great difference in your marriage. I think you should read it. In the last chapter on appreciating your spouse, Dr. Beeke wrote something that jumped off the...

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Was Menno Simons a heretic?

Many Mennonites today seem to have not considered that Menno Simons had unorthodox views of Christ. Christians confess that Christ was “born of the virgin Mary.” This means, in part, that Jesus took on the human flesh from Mary his birth mother. Menno rejected this teaching. Consider the following post by Dr. R. Scott Clark: The So-Called “Celestial Flesh” Christology Is Just Gnosticism Why is this important? Consider Heidelberg Catechism 35-36: Q. 35. What...

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Calvin on the temptation not to pray

“For Satan has no method more effectual for ruining the salvation of the godly, than by dissuading them from calling on God. For this reason, he employs his agents to drive off from us, as far as he can, the desire to pray.” John Calvin and William Pringle, Commentary on a Harmony of the Evangelists Matthew, Mark, and Luke, vol. 3 (Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2010), 320.

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J. C. Ryle connects the cross to our hatred of sin

[Let] us ever learn from the story of the passion, to hate sin with a great hatred. Sin was the cause of all our Savior’s suffering. Our sins platted the crown of thorns. Our sins drove the nails into His hands and feet. On account of our sins His blood was shed. Surely the thought of Christ crucified should make us loathe all sin.[1] [1]

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A Marriage Made in Heidelberg (5): Our Inability & the Hope of Jesus Christ

Last time we thought about what God requires of us in marriage. God calls you and me to love our spouses with perfect love, and yet we are unable to do that. Hate is natural for us; love isn’t. Why? Because our nature is corrupted by sin. That’s why in marriage we must depend on God’s grace and Spirit daily to make strides in love, to put off the old self, and to put on Christ. As I said last time, “You need Jesus or you will fail,” meaning you will fail to love your spouse. My son...

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My article published on Word by Word blog

On my sabbatical last September/October, I wrote an article for publication in Bible Study Magazine. Well, the magazine ran its last issue in November/December. I just missed it. But with the kindness and help from Mark Ward, my article was published on the Word by Word blog in June. Read the article titled “Christ Crushed for Us: the Gospel in Isaiah 53.” Enjoy.

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A Marriage Made in Heidelberg (4): What God Requires in Marriage Is Beyond Us

Last week’s point was important: God’s law defines sin and uncovers where God’s transforming grace is needed. God’s law humbles a couple because both husband and wife have a sin problem. So, instead of attacking one another, humbly help one another deal with your biggest problem. You’re a team, an army of two. If you want to have electricity in your house, you are required to pay the electric bill. If you want to shop in certain stores, you need to be wearing shoes and a shirt. If...

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